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Special Topics, Cross-Regional & Capstone

Descriptions of special topics, cross-regional studies and capstone courses

Fall 2017

INTL 290.03 ST: Race, Ethnicity & Migration in Europe, TR 12:15, Malek (CRN 11450)

Europe is experiencing what has been called a "migration crisis," drawing refugees and migrants from other regions to its borders in unprecedented numbers. This course examines post-WWII migration to Europe with a focus on questions of
inclusion and exclusion, and through a comparative look at the various approaches to integration and multiculturalism undertaken across the continent.

INTL 290.04 ST: The Globalization of Paradise: The Caribbean, TR 3:05, Blake Scott (CRN: 11896)

The Globalization of Paradise: Caribbean History and Culture in Critical Perspective The aim of this course is to provide students with an historical, social, and environmental grounding on the impacts of globalization in the developing world, particularly with small nation-states and communities in the Caribbean and Latin America. Globalization will be interrogated as a concept and phenomenon beginning with European conquest and exploration, and through the eras of slavery, colonialism, and twentieth century post-colonialism. Of critical and related importance, students will also analyze the many ways the Caribbean has been imagined as a “paradise” by outsiders. The course examines the social consequences of this international influence in terms of migration, the African diaspora, racial politics, economic production and consumption, and environmental change. By the end of the course, students will have a clear understanding of how the twin themes of paradise and globalization have shaped patterns of development in the Caribbean, and more broadly, the Global South.

INTL 290.01  ST: Political Islam in a Turbulent Era,  Express II  MW  4:00 – 6:25  Ali Demirdas

While the 20th century witnessed the Islamic revival, the issue of political Islam has become among the most important and hotly debated issues in the world. This class is motivated by a set of interlinked questions designed to understand the roots and the nature of modern Islamic political movements in the Middle East, Central Asia, Southeast Asia and the West. What are their intellectual origins? How should we understand their relationship to colonialism, theology, nationalism, democracy, liberalism, development, and women and gender? How have Islamic political movements evolved over time?

We will explore these questions historically and in comparative perspective by drawing on scholarship from international studies, Islamic studies, sociology, anthropology, and history. By the end of the course, students should possess an empirically grounded understanding of contemporary Islamic movements as well as the analytical tools necessary to explain their behavior.

INTL 350.01 Cross Regional Studies, War: Regional, Political, Economic and Cultural Perspectives, TR 1:40, Pehl (CRN: 11674)

In an age of drones, terrorism, asymmetric and cyber warfare as well as nuclear proliferation, how has the landscape of violent political conflict evolved since the fall of Communism and the end of the Cold War only some 25 years ago? This course investigates the manifold regional and global facets of and questions related to conflict and security, situating these discussions in contemporary political, social and cultural realms. What does the ongoing breakdown of binary conceptual divisions into war and peace, civil and international wars, civilian and military targets as well as into state actors versus private actors mean for how wars start, how they unfold and how they get regulated and resolved? As a whole the course will undertake an examination of the changing nature of war and conflict itself in the 20th and early 21st Century using select regional examples.

INTL 350.02 Cross Regional Studies: World Systems and Globalization, MWF 1, Friedman (CRN: 11675)

This course examines the World Systems analysis approach introduced by Immanuel Wallerstein.  World Systems analysis rejects the distinctions between disciplines and dissolves regions in an effort to understand totalities.  World Systems analysis studied globalization before it was called globalization and is therefore the perfect paradigm for International Studies inquiry.  The class will evaluate the usefulness of World Systems analysis to current world events.

INTL 495.01 Capstone: Postcolonial World, MW 3:25, Foody (CRN 11474)

Spring 2017

INTL 290.01 ST: Turkish Foreign Policy in a Tumultuous Region, MWF 9:00 am, Demirdas (CRN 22532)

This course seeks to provide students with an understanding of the domestic and international forces that shape contemporary Turkish foreign policy. Coterminous with the Middle East, the Caucasus, and the Balkans, Turkey (and its ever-evolving foreign policy) has become especially important after the end of the Cold War. This evolution has become even more significant in the wake of the new millennia with the advent of the conservative AKP, which created a paradigm shift in Turkey’s decades-long traditional foreign policy.

While the focus of the course will be on current events, such as the situation in Syria and the Middle East as well as the relations with the European Union and the United States, theoretical and historical aspects of Turkey’s foreign policy will also be covered.

INTL 290.02 ST: Humanitarian and Development Aid - a critical examination focusing on Haiti, Guatemala and Nicaragua, TR 5:30 pm, Wuigk (CRN 21363) 

This course introduces students to the various actors involved in international development assistance such as different United Nations organizations, bilateral donor organizations like USAID and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs). After examining the history of humanitarian and development aid the course will examine global structures of poverty and inequality. Students will learn to analyze how effective the current aid system is. We will look at the classic question: does development aid does more harm than good? The course examines economic, political and cultural effects of aid programs on the recipient countries. We will look especially at countries where multiple donors operate uncoordinated, pursuing inconsistent agendas such as Haiti and Guatemala.

The main objective of the course is to expose students to the criticism that surrounds international humanitarian and development aid and develop an understanding of what needs to change moving forward.

INTL 290.03 ST: Drugs, Guns and Gangs in the Americas, Exp. II, MW 5:30 pm, Taylor (CRN 21535)

This course explores the dominant development theories, examines the historical legacy of authoritarianism and establishes a foundation to examine the relationship of crime, law, and governance in the context of emergent issues in contemporary Latin America. In brief, this course will explore underlying historical political, economic and social issues related to contemporary conditions and structures of crime and violence in the Americas.

INTL 290.01  ST:
Political Islam in a Turbulent Era  Express II  MW  4:00 –
6:25  Ali Demirdas

INTL 350.01 CRS: Revolution & Utopia, TR 3:05 pm, Foody (CRN 21574)

This course critically analyzes revolutionary movements from the 1950s to the present and their attempts to re-create society, politics, and the world at large.  We will trace the development of "Third World" movements in colonial and post-colonial contexts as well as their global effects. In addition, we will examine contemporary theories of revolution and the necessities, as well of dangers, of utopian projects. 

INTL 350.02 CRS: Global Governance in Transition Again? The Rise of the Rest, MWF 10 am, Pacheco (CRN 22219)

This course provides an overview of the evolving architecture, functions and outcomes of global governance, and it explores possible ways of improving the capacity of the international community as a whole to deal with contemporary global challenges.

INTL 495.01 Capstone: International Financial Crises, MW 3:05 pm, Maldonado (CRN 21246)

The response to international financial crises by experts, politicians, and others is that this financial crisis is different from others that have occurred in the past. In this capstone we will look at financial crises from the economic, political, and social perspective. We will start by discussing the different types of financial crises. We will then look at case studies of each type of crises across multiple regions and analyze the crisis’ economic, political, and social effects on the countries affected. Finally, we will discuss ways in which countries/international community can prevent or prepare for the effects of international financial crises. Students will conduct independent research related to financial crises, culminating in a final research paper. 

INTL 495.02 Capstone:TR 3:05 pm, Malek (CRN 21820)

In this capstone, the global movement of people across borders will be explored through four main themes. These themes examine the intersections of contemporary international migration with: a) law and society; b) ethnicity and race; c) kinship and the family; and d) humanitarianism and development.  In each area, we’ll examine borders and mobility in historical, sociological, anthropological, and artistic sources from multiple regions of the world. Students will conduct independent research related to these themes, culminating in a final research paper.

 

Fall 2016

INTL 290.02 ST: Peace and Conflict in the Middle East, MWF 1:00pm Demirdas (CRN 11175)

The course has several objectives. First, it aims to give students a more nuanced and complete understanding of the politics, societies and economies of the MENA. Second, it fosters students’ analytical skills, helping them to apply theoretical frameworks to problems in the Middle East. Finally, it seeks to supply students with the theoretical and empirical evidence necessary to evaluate and make critical, analytical arguments about the Middle East in comparative perspective.

INTL 290.04 ST: Refugees, Migrants, and Citizenship, TR 12:15-1:30, Malek (CRN 12178)

Who has the right to travel, to remain, or to belong? This course considers new theoretical approaches to migration and citizenship through ethnographic case studies examining a diverse array of refugee and immigrant experiences. How do exclusion and inclusion impact ideas of citizenship, race, and identity?  How is mobility enabled, disabled, and regulated by state and non-state actors in ways that impact integration and belonging? In working through these questions, students will draw on recent cases in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and the Americas to conduct analyses that draw out the intersections of migration and citizenship.  

INTL 290.05 ST:Comparative Social Movements, Express II, TR 5:30 Taylor (CRN 13528)

A broad-based, experiential study of the new developments in the social movements around the world focused upon historical, political, economic, social and cultural impacts of globalization and structural adjustment processes initiated on the late 20th century.

INTL 350.01 CRS: International Development, MWF 09:00 Maldonado (CRN 11860)

This course introduces students to problems of inequality in wealth and welfare from a global, comparative, and historical perspective. The causes and consequences of inequalities among countries, as well as gender, class, ethnic and regional stratification, are examined. Major topics on international development are studied in order to better understand problems which many countries and areas of the world face today.

INTL 350.02 CRS: World Systems and Globalization, MWF 01:00 Friedman (CRN 11861)

This course examines the World Systems analysis approach introduced by Immanuel Wallerstein.  World Systems analysis rejects the distinctions between disciplines and dissolves regions in an effort to understand totalities.  World Systems analysis studied globalization before it was called globalization and is therefore the perfect paradigm for International Studies inquiry.  The class will evaluate the usefulness of World Systems analysis to current world events.

INTL 390.01 ST: Law and Politics in South Asia, TR 1:40 Pehl (CRN 13349)

In this course, students investigate the interaction of law and politics in South Asian countries (e.g. India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka etc.). Themes include the rule of law and constitutionalism, democratization, citizenship and electoral laws, legal pluralism and judicial activism. Another part of the course will cover the role of international law in relation to South Asia and South Asia's role in international law and politics.

INTL 495.01 Capstone, Cosmopolitanism, TR 3:05, Foody (CRN 11623)

Cosmopolitanism suggests that all humans belong to one community, regardless of race, religion, gender, or national origin. This capstone explores philosophical, historical, and political attempts to imagine humanity as a single community, as well as critiques of those attempts. We will focus on a series of distinct, although interconnected, spheres of thought in today's world: (1) international law; (2) religion; (3) gender. Each of these spheres developed from a long history of imperial and colonial thinking. We will explore that colonial historical foundation as well as contemporary attempts to look outside it and create new approaches to international law, religion, and gender. Students will conduct independent research related to the course themes and present their research in class over the course of the semester. The three course themes may change based on student interest.

Spring 2016 
INTL 290.02 ST: Peace and Conflict in the Middle East, TR 9:00 Demirdas (CRN 21458)  

The course has several objectives. First, it aims to give students a more nuanced and complete understanding of the politics, societies and economies of the MENA. Second, it fosters students’ analytical skills, helping them to apply theoretical frameworks to problems in the Middle East. Finally, it seeks to supply students with the theoretical and empirical evidence necessary to evaluate and make critical, analytical arguments about the Middle East in comparative perspective.

INTL 290.04 ST: Drugs, Guns and Gangs in the Americas EXP II, MW 5:30 Taylor (CRN 21662)

This course explores the dominant development theories, examines the historical legacy of authoritarianism and establishes a foundation to examine the relationship of crime, law,and governance in the context of emergent issues in contemporary Latin America. In brief, this course will explore underlying historical political, economic and social issues related to contemporary conditions and structures of crime and violence in the Americas.

INTL 350.01 CRS: International Development, MWF 11:00 Maldenado-Bird (CRN 21712)

This course introduces students to problems of inequality in wealth and welfare from a global, comparative, and historical perspective. The causes and consequences of inequalities among countries, as well as gender, class, ethnic and regional stratification, are examined. Major topics on international development are studied in order to better understand problems which many countries and areas of the world face today.

INTL 350.02 CRS: Revolution & Utopia, TR 12:15, Foody (CRN 23378)

This course critically analyzes revolutionary movements from the 1950s to the present and their attempts to re-create society, politics, and the world at large.  We will trace the development of "Third World" movements in colonial and post-colonial contexts as well as their global effects. In addition, we will examine contemporary theories of revolution and the necessities, as well of dangers, of utopian projects. 

INTL 390.01 ST: Nationalism and Citizenship in Europe, TR 9:25 Ocak (CRN 21713)

This course aims to investigate how the configuration of nationality, citizenship and sovereignty was established in Europe.  The course starts with an examination of nationalism theories that try to answer the questions such as “What is a nation? Are national identities primordial or are they constructs?  What is nationalism? Are there good and bad nationalisms?” etc. After discussing various theoretical approaches to nations and nationalisms, the course moves on to engage deeply with the modernist approach and deals with the relation between state formation and the production of nation.  We will discuss the revolutionary formula of ethnos/demos nexus consolidated after the French Revolution by situating the emergence of modern citizenship within the capitalist/colonialist division of the world. Finally, the course will engage with the contemporary challenges to the nationality/citizenship equation that emerge as a result of globalization and flow of people from the periphery to the metropole.  We will explore the novel ways of inclusion to and exclusion from the polity and the new nationalist movements in Europe.

INTL 495.01 Capstone, Interrogating Globalization, TR 3:05 Samuel (CRN 21327)

As the capstone course for the International Studies Major, this course takes a critical, multi-disciplinary approach to the topic of international studies and globalization, providing an overview of the vast and ever-increasing literature from the perspectives of international relations, political science, anthropology, geography, history and economics. “Globalization,” as we shall discover, is a complex, contested, fluid and flexible concept; what it means, to whom and why will be our focal points of inquiry.

First, we will address the historical underpinnings and intellectual precedents of globalization. We then turn to the literature concerned with the transformation of social relations brought about by globalization. We will also explore ethnographic and critical approaches to the study of globalization.

Throughout the semester, we will be considering how globalization “works” as a discourse, how globalization is experienced, what its attributes might be, what shifts in political economic power relations the term denotes, and how we might develop a critical approach to its study.

INTL 495.02 Capstone, Genocide, MW 3:25 Pehl (22081)

For a complete listing of Fall 2015 course offerings, please click here

FALL 2015

INTL 290.02 ST: Latin America - Memory and Reconciliation, MWF 11:00-11:50 WUIGK (CRN 11267)

This course examines the long-term effects that Cold War conflicts have had on Latin America’s societies from a multidisciplinary perspective. The course will explore how decades of dictatorships, civil wars and violence are being remembered and dealt with since the peace agreements and the return to democracy. The regional focus will be on Guatemala, Peru, Chile and Argentina.This course will look at forms of collective memory, the attempts to achieve justice and building a new integrated democratic society. 

INTL 290.03 ST: Comparative Social Movements, TR 4:00-6:45 MIRANDA (CRN 11751)

A broad-based, experiential study of the new developments in the social movements around the world focused upon historical, political, economic, social and cultural impacts of globalization and structural adjustment processes initiated on the late 20th century. 

INTL 290.04 ST: Peace & Conflict in the Middle East, TR 1:40-2:55 DEMIRDAS (CRN 13276)

Course seeks to supply students with the theoretical and empirical evidence necessary to evaluate and make critical, analytical arguments about the Middle East in comparative perspective. 

INTL 350.01 CRS: Religion and Law in the Global Context, TR 3:05-4:20 FOODY (CRN 12116)

This course invites students to consider the relationship between religion and law in a variety of contexts. The goal of this course is not to decide how “religion” and “law” should interact; instead, we will instead ask questions about how certain understandings of or definitions of religion inform debates over the limits of religious practice, the dangers of religious identity, and the necessity of non-religious government. 

INTL 350.02  CRS: Transnational Migration, MWF 1:00-1:50           (CRN 12117)

The mobility of populations across international borders and the ensuing diasporic communities pose an array of important theoretical, conceptual and empirical questions; about the meanings of borders, the nature of (migrant) identity and culture, also in relation the nation-state and national identity. Migration also raises important questions about race and racism. In order to tackle these various questions and issues, the class will draw on a range of texts from academic writings, theorizations of migration, race, and ethnicity, journalistic accounts and films. Among the main migration movements tackled in the class are: North African migrations to Europe, West African migrations to Europe and the US, East Asian migration to the US, South Asian migration to Europe and inner-African migrations. 

INTL 390.02  ST: Cuban Society & Politics, MW 4:00-6:45 MIRANDA (CRN 11822)

A study of 20th and 21th century Cuba, its politics, civilization and culture. 

INTL 495.01  International Studies Capstone class, TR 3:05-4:20 SAMUEL (CRN 11786)

Please contact the department.