Amy Malek

Assistant Professor

Address: 9 Glebe Street, room 203
Office Hours: Fall 2021: by appointment via Zoom, please schedule through www.calendly.com/malekap
Phone: 843-953-3389
E-mail: malekap@cofc.edu
Personal Website: http://www.amymalek.com/



Education

Ph.D. in Anthropology; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

M.A. in Anthropology; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

M.A. in Near Eastern Studies; New York University

B.A. in International Studies & Middle East Studies; Emory University 


Research Interests

Professor Malek is a sociocultural anthropologist specializing in the intersections of migration, citizenship, and culture. Her research has focused on questions of memory, identity, belonging, and visual culture and focused primarily on Iranian and Middle Eastern communities in Europe and North America.


Courses Taught

Introduction to International Studies

International Migration

Refugees & Forced Migration

Race & Migration in Europe

Refugees, Migration, and Citizenship

Visual Anthropology

Culture & Society


Publications

“Persian Language Use & Vitality in Tehrangeles,” in Multilingual LaLa Land: Language Use in Sixteen Greater Los Angeles Communities, ed. Clair Hitchens Chik, Routledge, 2022, pp. 229-246. [forthcoming]

“Clickbait Orientalism and Vintage Iranian Snapshots,” International Journal of Cultural Studies 24, no. 2 (2021): 266-289. https://doi.org/10.1177/1367877920957348

"Subjunctive Nostalgia of Postmemorial Art: Remediated Family Archives in the Iranian Diaspora," Memory Studies 14, no. 2 (2021): 140-158. https://doi.org/10.1177/1750698019843977

“Negotiating Memories,” in My Shadow is My Skin: Voices from the Iranian Diaspora. eds. Katherine Whitney & Leila Emery. University of Texas Press, 2020.

"Paradoxes of Dual Nationality: Geopolitical Constraints on Multiple Citizenship in the Iranian Diaspora," Middle East Journal 73, no. 4 (Winter 2019): 531-554. https://doi.org/10.3751/73.4.11

“Displaced, Re-rooted, Transnational: Considerations in Theory and Practice of Being an Iranian outside Iran,” in Identity and Exile: The Iranian Diaspora between Solidarity and Difference, Heinrich Böll Foundation (2016). https://eu.boell.org/en/2016/05/03/identity-and-exile-iranian-diaspora-between-solidarity-and-difference 

“Claiming Space: Documenting Second Generation Iranian Americans in Los Angeles,” Anthropology of the Middle East 10, no. 2 (2015): 16-45. https://doi.org/10.3167/ame.2015.100203

“Public Performances of Identity Negotiations in the Iranian Diaspora: The New York Persian Day Parade,” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East 21, no. 2 (2011): 388-410. Persian translation published as: “Rejheh-ye Parsi Rooz New York,” Iran Nameh 26, no. 1-2 (2011): 87-116. https://doi.org/10.1215/1089201X-1264316

​“If you're going to educate 'em, you've got to entertain 'em too” : An Examination of Representation and Ethnography in Grass and People of the Wind,” Iranian Studies  44, no. 3 (2011): 313-325. https://doi.org/10.1080/00210862.2011.556373

“Memoir as Iranian exile cultural production: A case study of Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis series,” Iranian Studies, Vol. 39, No. 3 (2006): 353-380. https://doi.org/10.1080/00210860600808201